Salma Hayek for Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet

Date: Thursday, August 6. Venue: Apple StoreSoHo
Salma Hayek pays homage to her childhood with the introduction to her animated feature film. Her grandfather, a spiritual Lebanese, inspired her with what she recalls the great story of Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet, (a philosophy poetry book, written by an Arab man), and remembers a very distinct nostalgic sense of freedom. “We are not our bank account,” she tells the audience, “we are what no one sees.” Salma urged the crowd to “love as a pair” but warned us not lose our identity in the union of marriage.
The movie, filled with free range art, music and poetry, is a self-help journey that is predominately spiritual, where flying birds symbolize freedom. The film, Salma Hayek tells us, has no country. She also said acquiring the cast was the easiest part of the film process, since the actors loved the poetry, including Liam Neeson.

Salma Hayek
Salma Hayek

Salma Hayek addresses the racial stereotypes in children’s films, breaking down statistically how out of 74 white characters, only 26 are identified as other, unlike her film, which features colorfully diverse characters. Hayek reminds us to have the courage to be unique and cherish individualism. “Trying to produce original material is nearly impossible,” she tells us of the project process, a piece dear to her heart, “there’s a lot of symbolism for all women to find courage, find their voice.”
One audience member asked, “Why an animated feature film and not a live cast?“ To which Salma replied, “Art is unlimited, whereas humans are limited. There is a raw energy to handmade art, an organic movie creation that cannot be compared to anything else.”
Dare to free your mind and spirit, watch Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet.

Jesenia (JGB Editor)​[For more articles, videos and photos – Follow Jesenia’s Goodie Bag]

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